The Scoop

Coffee & Tea News

Christopher C.

Tuesday, March 22, 2022

Updated February 06, 2023

  • What’s the difference between coffee estates and coffee co-operatives?

    By Peter Gakuo for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Two of the most widespread coffee farming models are estates and co-operatives. The former is simply a coffee farm (usually a large one) which generally processes and sells its coffee alone. The latter, meanwhile, is a model which encompasses a group of farmers who process and sell their coffee collectively in order to gain better access to equipment, facilities, and business opportunities. While both models have their advantages and drawbacks, in recent years, smallholder producers in some countries have started to leave co-ops in favour of alternative farming models.”

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  • An In-Depth Look at Gruppo Cimbali’s Coffee Technician Wheel

    By Vasileia Fanarioti for Barista Magazine

    “The Coffee Technician Wheel is divided into two main sections. The first part covers technical parameters, which are external factors that can be changed, such as water, the espresso machine, and the grinder. The second section is the organic properties of coffee—internal factors linked to the type/species of coffee, roasting conditions, and more. These elements cannot be altered, but can be managed to produce optimum results in the cup.”

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  • How do you roast coffee for milk?

    By Zoe Stanley for Perfect Daily Grind

    “In recent years, more roasters have developed roast profiles which are specifically designed to be used as espresso for milk-based drinks. Essentially, these roast profiles ensure that the coffee’s flavours are expressed in a way which is complementary to the natural sweetness and creaminess of milk. For example, Ethiopian or Kenyan coffees roasted to lighter profiles tend to be brighter and have more floral and fruity flavours. Ultimately, this means that milk could overpower these more delicate tasting notes – or even result in sour and unpleasant flavours. In turn, many consumers often prefer these coffees to be served without milk, including as espresso or pour over.”

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The Archives
January 2023
Week of January 30, 2023
  • What is syphon brewing & how does it affect coffee extraction?

    By Rachel Keen for Perfect Daily Grind

    “While it’s believed that the first-ever vacuum coffee brewer was invented by Loeff of Berlin sometime in the 1830s, syphons started to become commercially available in the mid-1800s thanks to French inventor Marie Fanny Amelne Massot. Around the same time, Scottish engineer Robert Napier designed his Napier Coffee Pot, which also creates a vacuum to brew coffee. […] Since then, many types of vacuum brewers have entered the market, but the most popular model is the syphon – specifically the Hario syphon, which is widely used in Japanese and Taiwanese coffee shops.”

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  • How to turn spent coffee grounds into a punchy kombucha – recipe

    By Tom Hunt for The Guardian

    “I love upcycling coffee grounds. For starters, they are free, and they are also carbon-positive, because you’re repurposing a product that would otherwise have gone to waste. Coffee kombucha is much like traditional kombucha, and has a serious caffeine kick, so I tend to have only a small glass at a time, otherwise I can get the coffee jitters or even anxious.”

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  • How did oat milk get so popular?

    By Janice Chinna Kanniah for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Over the past few years, it’s been impossible to ignore the meteoric rise of oat milk in specialty coffee. In fact, oat milk is so popular that it’s now uncommon for a coffee shop not to stock it. According to research from World Coffee Portal in 2021, 16% of UK consumers have tried oat milk in a coffee shop in the past 12 months – making it the most popular plant milk in the country. Moreover, UK sales of oat milk increased by over 100% between 2019 and 2020 to £146 million (US $177.8 million).”

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Week of January 23, 2023
  • Does GMO coffee exist?

    By Leah Bowman for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Today, there are around 120 identified species of coffee, which means there is an almost endless number of different varieties – especially when we consider wild varieties which grow naturally. Hybrid varieties, which are cultivated by researchers and agronomists to improve both yield and quality, are also becoming more common. And while these hybrid varieties aren’t technically genetically modified, their existence still leads to a pertinent question: can coffee be genetically modified? And if so, what are the advantages?”

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  • 10 Minutes With Shannon Wheeler

    By Vasileia Fanarioti for Barista Magazine Online

    “In this interview, we get to know a bit more about the artist and creator of Too Much Coffee Man, Shannon Wheeler. TMCM is a comic book series that first appeared in the early ’90s and has since become a cult classic. The main character, Too Much Coffee Man, is a superhero with amazing powers derived from coffee. He rarely sleeps and has an excess of caffeine, giving him the ability to go into manic paranoid frenzies in combat.”

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  • What is the Weiss Distribution Technique & should you use it before tamping coffee?

    By Yudi Guo for Perfect Daily Grind

    “There are many variables to consider when pulling espresso shots, which include dose, yield, extraction time, and grind size. As well as these, we also need to remember that puck preparation techniques – including distribution and tamping – are equally important. Essentially, good distribution and tamping techniques help you to achieve even extraction and allow you to get the best out of your coffee.”

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Week of January 16, 2023
  • Is this the future of Coffee?

    By Stuart Ritson for Caffeine Mag

    “Scientists in Finland recently recreated coffee in a lab, using just a coffee plant and equipment that could replicate cells on a massive level. ‘‘Artificial coffee’ is about combining flavours,’ the leader of this scientific team, Heiko Rischer, tells me. ‘What we are doing is 100% coffee, just made in a different way.’”

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  • Additive Fermentation: “Infused” Coffee Is Gaining Popularity—and Sparking Industry Debate

    By Chris Kornman for Roast Magazine

    “Fermentation for coffee has long been a simple matter of practicality—processors harnessed the power of bacteria and yeasts to extract the coffee seed from its fruit. It wasn’t viewed as a quality additive process; it was risk mitigation—reducing the amount of material separating us from the green bean, thereby reducing processing risk and improving consistency. However, the past 10 years or so have proven to the specialty industry that fermentation also has potential to be additive. One trend among some coffee professionals is to take that ‘additive’ principle as literally as possible by co-fermenting—or infusing—coffee pulp or whole coffee fruit with extra ingredients.”

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  • World Coffee Research Launches Global Coffee Breeding Network

    By Chris Ryan for Barista Magazine

    “WCR has launched Innovea, a global breeding network of nine countries that will ‘transform global coffee breeding and accelerate the pace of genetic improvement,’ per a press release from WCR. They chose the Innovea name by combining ‘innovation’ with Coffea, the plant name of the coffee species, so the name loosely translates to ‘coffee innovation.’ ‘Coffee faces a crisis of innovation that makes the industry’s sustainability, quality, and supply assurance goals impossible to achieve if we stay on the path we are on,’ says WCR CEO Dr. Jennifer (Vern) Long in the press release.”

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Week of January 09, 2023
  • Coffee, with a Side of Deadline Hectoring

    By Ann Tashi Slater for The New Yorker

    “Since 2019, [Takuya] Kawai has tried out several other themes in the space—a coffee-and-cigarettes café, a video-editing café, a café to sort receipts—but they haven’t taken off, partly because of covid. ‘The Manuscript Café is my fourth time at bat,’ he said, miming a slow-motion swing. The inspiration for this iteration came not just from the Miyazawa [book, The Restaurant of Many Orders] but also from Tokyo’s Hilltop Hotel, where such writers as Yukio Mishima and the Nobel laureate Yasunari Kawabata were once confined by their editors, to make them finish their projects.”

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  • Is specialty coffee growing faster than global coffee consumption?

    By Zoe Stanley for Perfect Daily Grind

    “‘In terms of numbers, the growth rate of the specialty coffee market is faster than the growth of commodity-grade coffee,’ Daniel [Velásquez Restrepo, Director of Operations at Amativo Colombia,] says. ‘However, in terms of market share, this faster level of growth isn’t comparable to the large volumes of commodity-grade coffee exports, which represent around 90% of Colombia’s exports, for instance.’ According to Euromonitor, the total value of global retail sales of coffee was US $180 billion in 2019, and sales are predicted to grow by another US $12.5 billion by 2023.”

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  • The Secret to Studying Coffee Consumption? It’s in the Bathroom

    By Zac Cadwalader for Sprudge

    “Self-reporting has been the best tool available for comparing coffee consumption habits to its health impact. Until now. Researchers from Germany’s Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich (LSB) have identified three metabolites that could serve as specific biomarkers for coffee consumption in an individual. Published recently in the journal Food Chemistry, researchers set out to find if coffee consumption resulted in any measurable metabolites, substances created when the body breaks down food, drinks, drugs, etc.”

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Week of January 02, 2023
  • Liberica, a rare type of coffee, could dominate by the end of the century

    By Ross Pomeroy for Big Think

    “Rising temperatures and more frequent disease threatens the popular Arabica and Robusta species, which respectively make up 55% and 45% of the market. A more resilient species of coffee called Liberica could become the leading variety by the end of the century.”

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  • ‘Tis The Season For Holiday Coffee Traditions

    By Jenn Chen for Sprudge

    “You know you’ve hit a turning point in your coffee hobby or profession when you find yourself prioritizing coffee plans before you travel. Do you pack a set of brew equipment? Rely on a handful of instant coffee packets? Or identify the specialty roasters near where you’re staying?”

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  • Should we weigh milk in coffee shops?

    By Yudi Guo for Perfect Daily Grind

    “First and foremost, weighing milk-based beverages can help to reduce milk waste, which is particularly useful for coffee shops. Most baristas are trained to carefully eyeball the amount of milk they pour for each drink, but even the most experienced baristas can sometimes use too much. Of course, this leads to leftover steamed milk, which if not used for other beverages, can quickly increase a coffee shop’s waste costs. In fact, some coffee shops can waste up to US $15 of leftover milk every day.”

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December 2022
Week of December 26, 2022
  • Should you grind coffee by weight rather than time?

    By Zoe Stanley for Perfect Daily Grind

    “While both timed and gravimetric grinders can produce excellent espresso, there are some notable differences in how they grind coffee. Gravimetric grinders measure the weight of the coffee as it is ground and dispensed into the portafilter. Once the pre-programmed weight has been reached (which is determined by the user), the motor will automatically shut off. […] In order to improve workflow as much as possible, grinding consistently accurate doses is important. This allows baristas to work faster, while still maintaining high-quality beverages and giving baristas more time to serve customers.”

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  • The Language of Coffee Flavor: A Century of Tasting in Review

    By Kat Melheim for Roast Magazine

    “Before [the Coffee Taster’s Flavor Wheel, invented in 1995], there was no visual representation or common language for flavor in the coffee industry. In the grand scheme of a centuries-old coffee trade, we have seen a massive amount of innovation within a relatively short time.”

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  • What Is WDT in Espresso? We Talked to Its Creator, John Weiss

    By Howard Bryman for Daily Coffee News

    “WDT stands for Weiss Distribution Technique, an espresso preparation technique attributed to retired computer scientist and biochemistry PhD John Weiss. The tool used to perform this technique typically involves an array of needles or other slim protrusions extending from a handheld piece. The tool is used to stir the freshly ground coffee in an espresso portafilter basket prior to tamping.”

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Week of December 19, 2022
  • How can social initiatives improve gender equity in coffee production?

    By Benedicte Gyllensten for Perfect Daily Grind

    “There’s no denying that women working in coffee production face a number of unique and complex issues. Despite playing a significant role in the labour involved in coffee production, women have comparatively diminished access to financial and educational resources in the coffee sector, and generally are less empowered to make decisions, hold leadership roles, and own land in a number of coffee-growing regions. In turn, this means women coffee workers typically earn significantly less money than their male counterparts.”

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  • 4 Coffee Podcasts Worth Hearing

    By Barista Magazine

    “In the last 18 years, podcasts have become a staple of media communication; they’re easy to access, cover every imaginable topic, and are available with a simple click. It’s no mystery why podcasts became so popular. Almost every possible (and impossible) topic is covered in at least one podcast nowadays, and the world of specialty coffees is no exception. Here’s a short list of some interesting podcasts that will tell you more about your favorite drink.”

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  • What Happens If You Overgrind Coffee Beans?

    By Meggan Robinson for Tasting Table

    “The reason we grind coffee to different sizes or levels is to get the ideal amount of extraction from the beans, and different brewing methods require varying degrees of grinding. Under-extracted coffee from beans ground too coarse will lead to a taste that is salty, acidic, and tart. Over-extracted coffee beans that are ground too fine will result in a cup that is tasteless and acrid.”

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  • What is cryodesiccation and how can it be used in coffee?

    By Thomas Wensma for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Anthony [Douglas, winner of the 2022 World Barista Championship] mentions that cryodesiccation helped to enhance the natural sweetness and creaminess of his milk, and ultimately created a higher-quality beverage and overall sensory experience. So how exactly does this process work, and could it have an influence on the wider specialty coffee sector?”

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Week of December 12, 2022
  • Why 2022 is the year of the espresso martini

    By Jordan Valinsky for CNN Business

    “It might be 2022, but people are still ordering espresso martinis like it’s the 90s. The coffee-flavored drink has experienced such a resurgence that it has entered the top 10 list of most ordered cocktails at US bars this year, according to research firm CGA by Nielsen IQ. The espresso martini has even displaced the classic Manhattan, a bourbon-based cocktail, in the top 10.”

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  • Why isn’t soy milk popular anymore?

    By Melina Devoney for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Although it has been consumed for centuries in some countries (mostly throughout Asia), soy milk started to become more popular in coffee shops during the 1990s. In fact, for many years, it was one of the very few plant-based options for people who didn’t consume dairy in both coffee shops and supermarkets. In some cases, soy milk was the only choice for these consumers.”

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  • How do you pour great latte art at home?

    By Zoe Stanley for Perfect Daily Grind

    “When the majority of out-of-home coffee businesses closed in the first few months of the pandemic, many consumers started to make more coffee at home. As part of this, more and more people wanted to create café-quality beverages themselves – including milk-based drinks. However, it’s safe to say that pouring high-quality latte art can be difficult, even for those with more experience and skills. Moreover, it can also be challenging to produce good microfoam without the right equipment.”

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Week of December 05, 2022
  • What makes coffee production in Okinawa unique?

    By Rachel Keen for Perfect Daily Grind

    “A small part of Japan also technically lies in the Bean Belt, meaning it has the right climatic conditions for coffee production. The Okinawa Islands, located some 26 degrees north of the Tropics, are home to around 30 coffee farms which produce small quantities of green coffee. […] Although Okinawa is by no means a major coffee producing region, the expertise on the island and the conditions mean it does have the potential to yield high-quality beans. The island’s unique terrain and climate can impart desirable flavours to the coffee – with some producers and roasters claiming that no two harvests yield the same results.”

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  • US Barista Champ Morgan Eckroth On Life After WBC (And What’s Next)

    By Sprudge

    “Always with a flare for the dramatic, Eckroth’s routine in Melbourne included not one but two high end coffees—the Eugenioides and Sudan Rume, both from Colombia’s Cafe Inmaculada and roasted by Onyx Coffee Lab—as well as a show-stopping moment involving the smashing of espresso cups. This before serving judges signature beverages in vessels repaired using kintsugi, a centuries-old Japanese technique of repairing pottery with gold.”

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  • Should You Avoid Buying Bleached Coffee Filters?

    By Sylvia Tomczak for Tasting Table

    “Brewing the perfect cup of coffee relies on a few key elements like fresh grounds, distilled water, and […] good quality coffee filters. The question is, which filters result in a better-tasting java: bleached or unbleached?”

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November 2022
Week of November 21, 2022
  • The Quest to Make the Best Worst Cup of Coffee

    By Alina Simone for The Atlantic

    “My first glass of black, undiluted, pure robusta was a punch in the neck. It was 2,000-proof vodka plus caffeine. It made me want to dive, open-mouthed, into a swimming pool filled with sweet cream. This was nothing like the other wimpy thing called ‘coffee’ I’d spent my entire life drinking, and at some primitive, sensory level, I struggled to process it. But I controlled my expression because Bang Duong, the man who’d grown and roasted and brewed this Thorlike drink, was seated right across from me.”

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  • How can controlled fermentation processing methods enhance coffee flavour and quality?

    By Rachel Keen for Perfect Daily Grind

    “All coffee undergoes some level of fermentation. As soon as cherries are harvested, the sugars and acids contained within the mucilage of the coffee fruit (a sticky, translucent substance which surrounds the seeds) begin to break down. This is largely where the sweetness in coffee derives from. With washed coffee processing, farmers soak depulped cherries in water for several hours to remove any remaining flesh and mucilage. This usually results in a cleaner-tasting and brighter flavour profile, and can highlight more of the coffee’s acidity.”

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  • Women in East African coffee production

    By Peter Gakuo for Perfect Daily Grind

    “A large proportion of East African coffee workers are women. In fact, in 2018, the International Coffee Organisation (ICO) reported that up to 70% of labour in coffee production is carried out by women, although this number can vary between countries and regions. Despite making up a significant proportion of the coffee labour workforce, East African women often earn substantially less money than their male counterparts. This is largely a result of prejudiced misconceptions about womens’ roles in decision making, as well as a lack of progress in improving womens’ access to finance.”

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Week of November 14, 2022
  • Are blends becoming more popular in specialty coffee?

    By Zoe Stanley for Perfect Daily Grind

    “For many years now, single origins have been popular in specialty coffee shops around the world, as well as in the World Coffee Championships (WCC) – favoured by many coffee professionals for their complex and delicate flavour profiles. However, over the past year, we have seen more and more roasters selling high-scoring coffee blends, and more WCC competitors using blends in their performances.”

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  • Deep Fried Coffee: A Horrifying Discovery

    By James Hoffmann on YouTube

    “As for why this video exists - I don't have a good explanation, other than I was genuinely curious as to how this would turn out! Also, because you're going to ask: total fry time was 14:30.”

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  • Should you brew experimentally processed coffees differently?

    By Sam Elliot for Perfect Daily Grind

    “No matter which processing method is used to process coffee, it will have a huge impact on the final cup profile. For farmers, processing is one of the most important steps in coffee production, and can also add significant value to coffee. The three most well-known ‘traditional’ processing methods are washed, natural, and honey processing. These methods are used by many producers along the Bean Belt, and result in a variety of different flavours and mouthfeels. However, in recent years, we have seen more and more producers try a range of different experimental processing techniques – but what exactly are they?”

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Week of November 07, 2022
  • How can you brew coffee with the AeroPress using different grind sizes?

    By Thomas Wensma for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Considering how the AeroPress extracts coffee, there are a number of variables you need to take into account but finding the right grind size is one of the most important steps. Ultimately, the grind size will significantly influence the extraction of flavours and aromas, so choosing the right one for your recipe will ensure your coffee isn’t under or overextracted.”

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  • What Is Oat Milk?

    By Liz Clayton for Sprudge

    “Oat milk can be made in a variety of ways, all of which require mixing oats (either from oat flour or in larger pieces) with water. A popular method is enzymatic hydrolysis, a process which accentuates the release of sugars from the oats, making the drink taste naturally sweet. You can also make oat milk at home by soaking oats in water, blending, and straining.”

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  • How the World Barista Championship Has Evolved Over the Years

    By Michelle Welsch for Tasting Table

    “The winner of this first competition was Robert William Thoresen; he was the only participant to bring his own milk, coffee grinder, and make a drink with latte art. The espresso machine the competitors used had only two group heads, and a mirror was placed above the set-up for the audience to watch what the baristas were doing as judges ranked drinks according to technical and sensory criteria.”

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October 2022
Week of October 31, 2022
  • The Picture of Finca Dorian Gray

    By Sprudge

    “The private auction has brought in bidders from around the world, and those that couldn’t make the trip are watching online, hoping to grab one of these very exclusive coffees. The first 15 lots came and went without much fanfare, a $50 a pound Gesha here, a $75 per pound lactic fermentation there, even a washed Eugenioides that broke the $100 mark. But they were all appetizers, chum to whip the sharks into a feeding frenzy for the main course, three ultra-rare small lots from the famed Finca Dorian Gray in Kona.”

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  • Exploring the evolution of milk foaming technology in the coffee industry

    By Zoe Stanley for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Many milk-based beverages also feature a layer of microfoam. As well as the unique texture that microfoam has, baristas also use it to pour latte art, which has now become commonplace in many specialty coffee shops around the world. To assist baristas in preparing high-quality milk-based coffee beverages, milk foaming technology has evolved over the past few years – from high-powered steam wands to automated countertop milk foaming solutions.”

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  • A guide to the Ruiru 11 coffee variety

    By Peter Gakuo for Perfect Daily Grind

    “As with many other hybrid varieties, Ruiru 11 was developed because of the increasing prevalence of pests and diseases. The most prominent example was a coffee berry disease (CBD) epidemic in 1968, which destroyed around half of Kenya’s coffee production that year. […] In response to rising cases of CBD, a coffee station in Ruiru began breeding coffee varieties in the 1970s which were more resistant to the disease – as well as still producing satisfactory volumes of high-quality coffee.”

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Week of October 24, 2022
  • 7 Spooky Coffee Stories to Tell in the Dark

    By Sprudge

    “Looking for spooky coffee stories to tell in the dark? Searching for harrowing tales of haunted cafes, werewolf baristas, bone dry cappuccino, and deadly drive-thrus? Look no further!”

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  • Exploring trends in experimental coffee processing

    By Ana Pipunic for Perfect Daily Grind

    “When it comes to coffee production, processing is one of the most important steps. As well as being key for preserving quality, processing can also enhance certain flavours, or create new ones altogether. In recent years, we have seen more and more producers try a range of different experimental processing techniques. These include aerobic and anaerobic fermentation, carbonic maceration, and lactic fermentation. So as these processing techniques become more prominent in the specialty coffee sector, which trends can we expect to see in the coming years? And how might they evolve?”

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  • The Joy of Growing Coffee as a Houseplant

    By Jenn Chen for Sprudge

    “If you are not into houseplants yet, I must warn you that it’s a lot like any other hobby out there. Once you catch that bug (pun intended), you start getting pulled into the rabbit hole, and then you find yourself looking up things like gnat lifecycles and how to make your own soil compositions. Remember, I warned you.”

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Week of October 17, 2022
  • Coffee drinking is associated with increased longevity

    By The European Society of Cardiology

    “‘In this large, observational study, ground, instant and decaffeinated coffee were associated with equivalent reductions in the incidence of cardiovascular disease and death from cardiovascular disease or any cause,’ said study author Professor Peter Kistler of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.”

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  • Why Attending Coffee Competitions Is Worth It

    By Tanya Nanetti for Barista Magazine Online

    “From fun events like latte art throwdowns to specific brand competitions (such as those for AeroPress and Comandante) to highly professional championships like those organized by the Specialty Coffee Association or the famous Coffee Masters, there’s always some cool event a coffee lover can attend. But what are some good reasons for participating in a coffee competition? And is there a wrong reason?”

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  • Why are people calling for reform in Kenyan coffee production?

    By Peter Gakuo for Perfect Daily Grind

    “[Kenya’s] coffee production has been steadily declining since the 1990s for a number of reasons. These include a widening generational gap in coffee farming and the increasing prevalence of several pests and diseases. Some coffee professionals believe that for Kenyan coffee production to return to its former heights, however, change must occur at a policy level. Some steps have already been taken to change the structure of the country’s coffee sector – most notably the country’s Coffee Bill 2021.”

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Week of October 10, 2022
  • What is Sidra coffee?

    By Alex Bidstrup for Perfect Daily Grind

    “While the variety itself is not especially well known, it is becoming increasingly prominent at [World Coffee Championship] events. […] Initially, it was reported that Sidra was produced by crossbreeding Typica with Bourbon – two high-quality varieties from which many coffee plants today can be traced back to. However, recent findings from World Coffee Research found that Sidra may have been developed using Ethiopian heirloom varieties – an overarching term used for the many wild or genetically unidentified varieties which are native to the East African country.”

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  • What Does Anaerobic Fermentation Mean for Coffee?

    By Liz Clayton for Sprudge

    “In anaerobic processing, a producer has specifically deprived the coffee’s surrounding environment of oxygen during the fermentation stage, which can have unique effects on its ultimate flavor profile. Deprivation of oxygen can happen within a bag, vat, or other container that limits oxygen’s ability to reach the coffee as it ferments.”

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  • How can coffee roasters attract new wholesale customers?

    By Rob Bathe for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Although a large majority of a roaster’s sales come from ecommerce platforms and in-store purchases of retail coffees, many roasters also have partnerships with wholesale clients who buy larger volumes of roasted coffee. These are often coffee shops and other businesses which serve coffee beverages. In many cases, these customers are one of the most effective ways to quickly generate revenue and improve profitability. However, working with wholesale customers comes with its own unique set of challenges – often forcing roasters to quickly adapt to their needs and demands.”

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Week of October 03, 2022
  • Here Are the Winners of the 2022 World Barista Championship & World Brewers Cup

    By Zac Cadwalader for Sprudge

    “There’s a lot to unpack in these 12 routines, and that is something we will be doing in the coming weeks as we rewatch the tape and go in-depth with the winners, but right now it’s time to take a breath and appreciate what we all just witnessed and those that brought it to us.”

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  • Creating a signature blend for your coffee shop

    By Tasmin Grant for Perfect Daily Grind

    “In today’s competitive specialty coffee market, it’s important for coffee shops to stand out. One of the many ways they can do this is by roasting coffee in-store – creating a unique customer experience that also maximises coffee freshness. Coffee shops can also develop their own signature blends, which help to differentiate them from their competitors. Signature blends not only provide a consistent and repeatable flavour profile for consumers, but they can also be a unique selling point for a coffee shop.”

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  • Hojicha and Matcha: Know the Difference

    By Emily Meneses for Barista Magazine

    “It’s safe to say that matcha has found a permanent place on most café menus as an alternative to coffee—but have you heard of hojicha? In Japan, hojicha is an overarching term that describes any green tea that’s been roasted. The word hojicha is derived from a Japanese verb meaning “to roast.” For centuries, the tea has been lauded for its soothing aroma, earthy and balanced flavor, and relaxing properties.”

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September 2022
Week of September 26, 2022
  • Pumpkin Spice Is Now Dictionary Official

    By Zac Cadwalader for Sprudge

    “Pumpkin spice joins the like of sponcon, yeet, sus, metaverse, altcoin, and oat milk as the newest officially recognized words in the English language. It’s been a long time in the making, this pumpkin spicing of the dictionary. The term has been around for nearly a century, but it wasn’t until the last 20 years or so that pumpkin spice really started to grab the attention of the world at large.”

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  • Misunderstood Coffee Drinks: The Shakerato

    By Eddie P. Gomez for Barista Magazine

    “Elusive, elegant, and definitely one of the most refreshing cold drinks available during warm weather, the caffé shakerato is an espresso-based drink that is typically served up foamy in a martini glass. It’s a popular drink in Italy throughout the summer months. A well-made shakerato delivers an intense but balanced flavor punch, even though it is made of only three ingredients: espresso, sugar, and ice.”

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  • Here's What Happens If You Heat Up Cold Brew Coffee

    By Wendy Leigh for Tasting Table

    “Cold brew coffee, favored by many java junkies for its smooth, relatively mild flavor, actually packs a concentrated caffeine punch. After the beans and water co-mingle for all those hours, the caffeine content in a single cup of cold-brew can harbor from 10 to 30 more milligrams of caffeine than its hot-brew counterpart. That fact, along with other considerations, is why it helps to know what happens when you heat up cold brew coffee.”

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Week of September 19, 2022
  • Will coffee consumers’ focus on education continue beyond Covid-19?

    By Vasileia Fanarioti for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Naturally, [the pandemic] led many consumers to start brewing more coffee at home. According to a 2022 National Coffee Data Trends report from the National Coffee Association, a record 85% of the US population were drinking at least one cup of coffee per day in 2020. So, in response to this boom in home coffee consumption, some coffee shops and roasters started offering remote educational courses to people interested in making café-quality beverages. But as Covid-19 restrictions continue to ease around the world, we have an important question to ask: will the demand for these courses continue?”

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  • North France: Is cheese really dunked in coffee at breakfast?

    By Théophile Larcher for The Connexion

    “Maroilles is considered one of France’s strongest cheeses and was the focus of a recent competition during the 55th Foire du fromage in La Capelle (Aisne), where people competed to wolf down the largest amount of it. Coffee dipping was optional. The winner ate 1 kilo and 26 grams of the cheese in 20 minutes.”

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  • What is Touba coffee & how do you prepare it?

    By Isabelle Mani SanMax for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Across many countries in the Middle East and Africa, traditional brewing methods are still popular today – in both coffee houses and at home. One of these brewing methods is Touba coffee (also known as Sufi coffee): a popular traditional coffee beverage largely consumed in Senegal. The drink was first introduced to the country in 1902 by religious leader Sheikh Amadou Bamba Mbacké. Over the past few years, consumption of Touba coffee has become less linked to religion and more popular further afield, with many people across Senegal – and more recently in West African country Guinea-Bissau – enjoying the drink.”

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Week of September 12, 2022
  • Plunger, espresso, filter? Bitter coffee doesn’t mean ‘stronger’

    By Emma Beckett for Radio New Zealand

    “Caffeine content only explains a small part of the strength of coffee. Thousands of compounds are extracted, contributing to aroma, flavour and function. Each has their own pattern of extraction, and they can interact with each other to inhibit or enhance effects. […] There are also differences in how sensitive we are to the stimulant effects of caffeine. So what we are looking for in a cup, and getting from it, is dependent on our own unique biology.”

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  • Understanding Tanzania’s generational gap in coffee production

    By Peter Gakuo for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Currently, Tanzania is the fourth-largest producer of coffee in Africa. However, the country’s coffee industry has suffered from a steady decline in yields since the 1990s, aside from a brief resurgence in production during the mid-2000s. […] Since the country became independent in 1961, younger generations have started to migrate away from rural areas to bigger cities. This is largely because they believe there to be more profitable opportunities in urban areas, as is the case in many other countries around the world.”

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  • The Best Way to Brew Coffee Depends on What You Want from Your Java

    By Emma Beckett for The Conversation

    “Coffee – one bean with many possibilities. A big choice is how to brew it: espresso, filter, plunger, percolator, instant, and more. Each method has unique equipment, timing, temperature, pressure, and coffee grind and water needs. Our choices of brewing method can be cultural, social, or practical. But how much do they really impact what's in your cup?”

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Week of September 05, 2022
  • Can I Brew Coffee with Tap Water?

    By Liz Clayton for Sprudge

    “If you’re wondering if you can brew delicious coffee with just any old wet water, the sad answer is no—at least not for everyone. Whether or not the water from your tap will produce good results depends upon your own municipality and water source, as all tap water is not created equal.”

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  • How can rootstock grafting make coffee plants more resilient?

    By Tasmin Grant for Perfect Daily Grind

    “The effects of climate change are becoming more and more of a concern for the coffee industry – particularly for farmers. Findings from a research paper published earlier this year conclude that four of the five top coffee-producing countries in the world will see the amount of land suitable for coffee production fall by 2050. […] When executed successfully and in the right way, [rootstock grafting] can help coffee plants become more resilient to extreme weather.”

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  • Cortado: The Espresso Drink You Should Try on Your Next Coffee Run

    By Ryan Cashman for Tasting Table

    “Translated as "to cut" from Spanish, this espresso and milk infusion has developed a reputation of its own here in the States. According to Bon Appetit, by 2013 the cortado's popularity amongst American coffee drinkers was on the rise. It even got its own hashtag: #dailycortado.”

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August 2022
Week of August 29, 2022
  • Laser-extracted cold-brew coffee could be a Monday-morning game changer

    By Loz Blain for New Atlas

    “Researchers in Germany have created a laser-powered extraction system that pumps out cold-brew about 300 times faster than traditional methods. Arguably superior in flavor, aroma and caffeination, cold-brew coffee may soon be convenient too. […] The technique is derived from the laser synthesis and processing of colloids (LSPC) field, a method typically used to blast apart metal solids in solvent solutions and create solutions of suspended nanoparticles.”

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  • Exploring regenerative agriculture in coffee production

    By Tasmin Grant for Perfect Daily Grind

    “There’s no arguing that the demand for “sustainable coffee” is at an all-time high. Now more than ever, brands and consumers alike realise the importance of growing, buying, and drinking coffee that is both socially and environmentally sustainable. There are a number of complex reasons driving this focus. However, one of the most important for environmentally responsible coffee is the ever-growing threat of climate change, and the impact it has on the coffee sector.”

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  • Yes, You Can Use Your Blender as a Coffee Grinder (Baristas Agree)

    By Maki Yazawa for Well+Good

    “Although [Jiyoon Han, co-owner and founder of Bean & Bean] would love for everyone to have access to proper coffee-making equipment, she says it’s most definitely not a necessity. ‘As a roaster, we have to relinquish any sort of judgment because coffee is highly contextual. My goal is to meet the customer where they’re at, without forcing them or pushing them where they don’t want to be at that moment in time,’ she says.”

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Week of August 22, 2022
  • Everything You Need to Know About Japanese Tea

    By Oset Babür-Winter for Food & Wine

    “As the second-most consumed drink in the world, tea's ability to serve as a soothing ritual and smooth source of caffeine is anything but news. Much like wine, tea leaves can express a region's climate and terroir once brewed, and few growing regions are as varied and intriguing as Japan.”

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  • What is aged coffee?

    By Isabelle Mani SanMax for Perfect Daily Grind

    “When we talk about coffee ageing, we generally associate this with undesirable qualities. However, there are a number of processing techniques which rely on ageing to change or enhance flavours and aromas. Many of these processing techniques have been used for centuries in countries like India and Sumatra. One of the most prominent examples is Monsoon Malabar, which exposes the harvested coffee to monsoon rain and winds along the coast of Malabar for between three and four months. Typically, this process results in more earthy and spicy flavours, with a much heavier body.”

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  • Coffee May Help with Early Morning Nicotine Cravings

    By Zac Cadwalader for Sprudge

    “In the human brain, [nicotine] receptors are highly sensitive to withdrawals that come from a night without nicotine, otherwise known as sleep. They found that two compounds in coffee ‘may help restore the nicotine receptor dysfunction’ that leads to cravings. In other words, the coffee compounds appeared to quell the morning nicotine cravings these receptors cause.”

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Week of August 15, 2022
  • Certifications and direct trade in the coffee industry

    By Ana Pipunic for Perfect Daily Grind

    “In recent years, direct trade has become increasingly prominent in specialty coffee. The idea is simple: by reducing the number of intermediaries in the supply chain, the farmer receives a higher percentage of the final sale price. However, there is no official definition of direct trade, which leaves the model somewhat open to interpretation. There is also no specific “direct trade” certification for coffee – and as such, the definition of it can be used rather loosely in the coffee industry.”

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  • What Is Heirloom Coffee?

    By Liz Clayton for Sprudge

    “Heirloom coffee is a convenient (sort of) way to describe Arabica coffee plants whose variety may not be easy to ascertain. The term is of particularly abundant usage in reference to Ethiopian coffees, of which there are thousands of varieties, and where a particular producer’s output may include a broad range of these. When these coffees don’t fall into the easy categories that cultivated coffees in other growing origins do, they have often been grouped into the vague term ‘heirloom.’”

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  • A Coffee Competition All About the Moka Pot

    By Vasileia Fanarioti for Barista Magazine Online

    “The Professional Moka Challenge is an annual event that occurs in Italy. It is a barista competition with a difference—instead of using espresso machines, participants must use Moka pots to make their coffee. […] The Moka pot was invented there in 1933 by Alfonso Bialetti, and it has been a staple of Italian homes ever since. So what makes this competition so special?”

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Week of August 8, 2022
  • How to Clean a Coffee Grinder

    By Rachel Wharton for Wirecutter

    “If you’re busy, you can let this deep-clean slide for a few weeks or so, [Kaleena Teoh, co-founder and director of education at Coffee Project New York] said, but it really depends on how dark a roast you brew. Roasted coffee beans are covered in aromatic oils and the darker the roast, the oilier the beans are. Those oils build up with powdered coffee and coat or even clog the burr and chambers of your grinder.”

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  • Why is thermal stability important for manual coffee brewing?

    By Zoe Stanley for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Water temperature plays an important role in manual brewing. According to the Specialty Coffee Association, to properly brew high-quality coffee, your water should be between 90°C and 96°C (195°F to 205°F). However, alongside this, your brewing water should also remain at a stable temperature throughout the entire process. This is a concept known as thermal stability – an essential part of manual brewing. While temperature-controlled kettles can certainly help to improve thermal stability, your brewer also has an effect on it.”

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  • Study: Coffee Not Associated with Miscarriage or Other Negative Pregnancy Outcomes

    By Daily Coffee News

    “In an announcement of the findings, study author Gunn-Helen Moen calls into question the current World Health Organization guidelines that say pregnant women should drink less than 300 milligrams of caffeine—or the rough equivalent of two to three 8-ounce cups of brewed filter coffee—per day. […] ‘We wanted to find out if coffee alone really does increase the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, and the research shows this isn’t the case.’”

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Week of August 1, 2022
  • How does agitation affect filter coffee brewing?

    By Vasileia Fanarioti for Perfect Daily Grind

    “There are a number of variables to consider when brewing filter coffee, including brew temperature, extraction ratio, and grind size. One extraction variable that can often be ignored is agitation. Agitation is the process of disturbing or disrupting the coffee bed, either by pouring water directly onto it, or by stirring or swirling the mixture. Just how much you should agitate while brewing filter coffee is a topic of debate among coffee professionals, but it plays an important role in extraction.”

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  • How the Birds and the Bees Help Coffee Plants

    By Claudia Wascher and Thomas Ings for Daily Coffee News

    “Although Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) can self-pollinate, pollinators increase fruit set (when a flower transforms into a berry) size, and yield. Farmers often think of birds as a pest species, eating seeds and crops. But birds forage on the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari), a small beetle which is one the most harmful pests to coffee crops.”

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  • Which material should your grinder burrs be made from?

    By Ana Pipunic for Perfect Daily Grind

    “We all know the importance of investing in a good grinder, whether in a coffee shop or at home. For home consumers, grinding fresh for each cup is an essential part of producing delicious coffee that gets even remotely close to café-level quality. It’s important to note that while there are different types of coffee grinder, not all of them are manufactured to the same quality standards.”

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July 2022
Week of July 25, 2022
  • Chug, chug, then eat your mug: Edible coffee cup passes taste test

    By Carolyn Webb for The Age

    “Entrepreneurs Aniyo Rahebi and Catherine Hutchins tried about 250 recipes to develop their edible coffee cup. Their product had to be strong enough to hold hot liquid, but also had to break down naturally. It had to be tasty enough to be an attractive snack, but not change the flavour of the drink it was holding.”

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  • Umami flavours in coffee: What should you expect?

    By Perfect Daily Grind

    “Umami is a Japanese word that is often used to describe savoury flavours in food. It is commonly associated with meats and broths, fish, shellfish, cheeses, soy, and some mushrooms. It is considered by many to be a ‘fifth taste.’ […] ‘If you bake coffee, it can result in meaty, salty, and savoury flavours,” Takahito [Koyanagi] tells me. ‘Since acidity is usually burned during this process, baked coffee can often taste very flat.’”

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  • Why Coffee Often Tastes Better at a Café than at Home

    By Autumn Swiers for Tasting Table

    “There may be hundreds of types of coffee on the market, but the only two ingredients in coffee are literally beans and water — so, the H2O you're running through those grounds can make a big difference. Canada-based Coffee Mag explains that pre-existing minerals and alkalinity can neutralize the natural flavor notes in your beans. Depending on your water's mineral content, it can even knock out your coffee's acidity altogether. Your water's pH can swing the coffee's taste to bitter, neutral, or even sour instead of creamy and fresh.”

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  • What Is Coffee Creamer?

    By Liz Clayton for Sprudge

    “But would you believe coffee creamer does not contain cream? Another of life’s great riddles, coffee creamer is actually a stand-in for cream, with a sweeter flavor profile that many consider delightful, even international. It’s also, in many cases, dairy free. […] Look, everybody likes a little splash every now and then.”

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Week of July 18, 2022
  • The Wild World of 3D Printable AeroPress Accessories

    By Zac Cadwalader for Sprudge

    “Whether you’re making a pour-over or espresso, inverting or double filtering, the AeroPress is basically a blank canvas for a painting made of coffee brewing. It makes sense that this beloved piece of versatile plastic has captivated the imagination of 3D printing coffee folk more than any other device. […] Making coffee with the AeroPress is great, sure, but have you ever tried using it to make delicious fried dough?”

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  • What is qahwa coffee & how do you prepare it?

    By Isabelle Mani SanMax for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Qahwa is prepared and served similarly to Turkish coffee, but there are a number of differences between the two brewing methods. Traditionally, qahwa is brewed in a dallah, which is a traditional Arabic coffee pot. The coffee is boiled for around 20 minutes, before it is poured into fenjals: small cups with no handles. When pouring qahwa, a dallah is held high above a fenjal. Traditionally, the server should be standing while the guests are seated – usually on the floor.”

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  • Are Coffee Percolators Making a Comeback?

    By Autumn Swiers for Tasting Table

    "’Those who remember the strong, sometimes burnt taste of coffee from the percolators of old will be glad to know that modern versions yield better (but still bold) brews, not without the appliance's signature rhythmic pulse.’ The Spruce Eats calls the percolator ‘lightweight, great for camping, and wallet-friendly,’ and raves about its ‘ease of use, sleek design, durability, and effortless cleaning.’ It looks like, despite the odds, percolators might be making a comeback. So, is the device worth all the hype?”

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  • How does ageing cold brew coffee affect its flavour?

    By Josef Mott for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Its popularity and utility mean that it’s no surprise that many in the industry have been experimenting with the drink. Barrel ageing is clearly one way that cold brew is evolving, leveraging residual flavours to create a niche, experimental product. And while whiskey barrel ageing is certainly popular, it appears that this may actually open up other paths to age or infuse cold brew. Who knows – in the near future, we might see all kinds of unconventional and experimental cold brew options on coffee shop menus.”

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Week of July 11, 2022
  • 5 Unexpected Ways Coffee Influences Our Behavior

    By Bill Sullivan for Discover Magazine

    “Caffeine is the primary chemical in coffee, a psychoactive drug that alters how we feel and behave. Caffeine molecules resemble the body’s adenosine molecules, which accumulate in the brain the longer we are awake. And since caffeine looks like adenosine, it can block sensors and trick the brain to stay awake. Given its popularity, scientists have conducted many studies on coffee and caffeine to discern its effect on health and behavior. Here are five of the lesser-known surprises they have discovered.”

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  • The World’s Best Coffee Makers Are Turning to Moldy Beans

    By Kat Odell for Bloomberg

    “Chefs generally want to keep mold out of their kitchens, but they make an exception for koji. For around a decade, the fungus has been a secret weapon for trailblazing chefs like Rene Redzepi at Noma in Copenhagen, used to ferment grains, cure proteins and impart umami to dishes both sweet and savory. Now, the culinary world’s most popular mold is poised to become the biggest trend in the specialty coffee world. Enterprising producers believe the multipurpose ingredient can improve on mediocre coffee beans, and produce a better-tasting caffeinated cup.”

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  • If You Own an Espresso Machine, You Need a Knock Box

    By Tyler Chin for Gear Patrol

    “What makes a knock box a knock box is a bar that runs horizontally across the box for you to bang your portafilter to expel the puck. After you pull a shot, the puck is wet and hot. The moisture of the puck makes it get stuck inside the filter, and the puck is way too hot to go jamming your finger in there. Knocking the portafilter against the bar helps to get you a clean filter in almost no time at all.”

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Week of July 4, 2022
  • How can coffee shops use coffee concentrate?

    By Gisselle Guerra for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Now more than ever, we have a huge number of different ways to prepare coffee at our fingertips. As part of this, we’ve seen an explosion in the cold coffee segment; over the past few years, cold brew, nitro, and iced coffees have become more prevalent on coffee shop menus. However, as well as being able to use freshly brewed coffee or espresso for these beverages, coffee shops can also use coffee concentrate.”

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  • Here’s Why You Should Add an Extra Espresso Shot to Your Coffee

    By Autumn Swiers for Tasting Table

    “Rather than heading back to the cafe later in the afternoon for your pre-dinner pick-me-up, consider simply adding an extra shot to your morning joe in the first place. Those initial 120 mg in your mug plus the 63 mg in the added shot makes for a coffee with nearly 150% of the caffeine punch.”

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  • How to Make Coffee Without a Coffeemaker

    By Food Network Kitchen

    “Perhaps you are treated to freshly ground and roasted beans brewed in an elaborate digital thermal coffeemaker with built-in grinder. Or maybe you're low-maintenance and just want coffee and want it fast. That's all well and good, until the power goes out or the coffeemaker goes kaput. What now?”

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June 2022
Week of June 27, 2022
  • How have AeroPress recipes changed in recent years?

    By Zoe Stanley for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Because of its versatility, there are a seemingly endless number of ways to brew coffee with the AeroPress coffee maker. Naturally, this means there is plenty of space for innovation where the brewer is concerned. The [World AeroPress Championships have] helped the push for innovation when brewing with the AeroPress coffee maker, including experimenting with dose weight, water temperatures, and diluting or concentrating coffee by bypassing.”

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  • The Unexpected Ingredient You Might Find in Mexican Coffee

    By Derek Helling for Mashed

    “Mexicans in the northern part of the nation add dairy and sweeteners in a style that many from the United States are familiar with. The further south you travel, though, the less familiar the coffee becomes. Thus, you might find yourself encountering some preparations foreign to you if you don't spend a lot of time in Mexico.”

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  • Does green tea contain more caffeine than coffee?

    By Manuel Otero for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Generally, it’s accepted that coffee contains much more caffeine than tea. A quick Google search shows that in 100ml of coffee, there’s 40mg of caffeine, whereas for the same volume of ‘tea,’ there’s only 11mg. But one type of tea stands out among the rest as far as caffeine is concerned: green tea. Depending on how long they’re steeped for and where they come from, green tea leaves can actually contain much more caffeine than other types of tea.”

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  • What Is Cascara?

    By Liz Clayton for Sprudge

    “In an effort to explore the coffee plant’s wider possibilities, as well as reduce waste, finding ways to use cascara has become a recent interest for those who previously only focused on the inside of the coffee fruit.”

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Week of June 20, 2022
  • Addressing deforestation in coffee production

    By Ross Hindle for Perfect Daily Grind

    “In the simplest definition, deforestation is the removal of trees to increase land area for agricultural and commercial purposes. Extensive deforestation creates a number of environmental problems, as trees are habitats for many animal and insect species. Forests also prevent soil erosion and act as ‘carbon sinks.’ Through photosynthesis, trees absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and recycle it into oxygen – helping to mitigate the effects of climate change.”

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  • New Research Finds How Exactly Coffee Is Rewiring Your Brain

    By Zac Cadwalader for Sprudge

    “Studying the effects of coffee on the brain has gained quite a bit of momentum in the scientific community in the past year or so, with new research papers being published finding links between coffee consumption and more efficient brain activity. Some have even found that coffee could be altering how our brains run for the better. Continuing this trend, researchers from the Universities of Strasbourg and Lille, both in France, have found that caffeine may have ‘long-lasting changes in the brain’ and how it operates.”

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  • Why Cold Brew Is Often Made with Dark Roast Coffee Beans

    By Arianna Endicott for Tasting Table

    “The cold brew process can enhance the rich, earthy flavors of dark roast coffees in a way it doesn't for lighter roasts. Dark roast coffee is also the way to go if you're making a large batch of cold brew to store in your fridge, as the flavor profile holds up well throughout the brewing process.”

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  • Bored of your flat white? Try these new flavours, from ‘egg coffee’ to a milk tea mix

    By Lucy Corry for Stuff

    “Think of coffee and it is highly likely any number of European-inspired brews come to mind, delivered to you via a noisy chrome machine and served in a sturdy cup. But there is a whole world of ways to get that caffeine fix, and embrace other cultures, without leaving the country.”

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Week of June 13, 2022
  • Why You Should Embrace Coffee Culture in the Workplace

    By Adrian Nita for Entrepreneur

    “While many people are tempted to power through and try to get as much done as possible in a short period of time, this strategy is actually counterproductive. By taking frequent breaks and allowing yourself time to recharge and connect with your coworkers, you can boost your productivity and creativity. Unlike traditional team building activities, which can feel forced or awkward, coffee culture is a more casual way for people to gather outside of work and socialize.”

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  • What is a flat white & where did it come from?

    By Perfect Daily Grind

    “Once a unique beverage served in both Australia and New Zealand, the flat white can now be found in coffee shops around the world. […] One of the numerous claims to the invention of the flat white comes from Australian barista Alan Preston. He says he was the first coffee shop owner to permanently have the term ‘flat white’ on his menu in the mid-1980s.”

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  • Americans want coffee that tastes like candy

    By Jennifer A. Kingston for Axios

    “Sensing that our home-brewing habits are here to stay, consumer goods companies are flooding stores with new coffee products catering to our sweet tooth—and disguising the original taste.”

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  • Introducing extract chilling in coffee

    By Perfect Daily Grind

    “In his 2021 World Barista Championship (WBC) routine, three-time Australian Barista Champion Hugh Kelly introduced to the world stage a concept known as ‘extract chilling.’ During his performance, Hugh extracted his espresso over a frozen metal cube before allowing the shots to cool down. In his routine, he explained that this extraction method helps to preserve the flavour compounds in the coffee and heighten sweetness in particular.”

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Week of June 6, 2022
  • Is It OK to Let Your Kid Drink Coffee?

    By Christin Perry for Parents

    “It seems coffee shops are the new hangout for high schoolers, and the trend is quickly extending to middle schoolers too. Whether it's a cold drink while hanging out at the mall or a post-practice pick-me-up, kids are consuming caffeinated beverages at an alarming rate. But should kids drink coffee? What are the possible long-term and short-term side effects?”

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  • How can syntropic farming benefit coffee production?

    By Ana Paula Rosas for Perfect Daily Grind

    “While some agricultural models focus on increasing crop yield, Ernst points out that syntropic farming encourages more natural and sustainable methods of food production. For instance, planting several different species of trees together in the same area will encourage biodiversity. The number of animals, birds, insects, and microorganisms will increase, thereby creating a more healthy and diverse ecosystem.”

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  • Coffee Makes Your Brain Run Better

    By Zac Cadwalader for Sprudge

    “You don’t exactly need an advanced degree in a hard science nor any real notion of the inner workings of your thinking organ to understand that the day’s first cup of coffee turbocharges your faculties. Nonetheless, scientists have taken to studying how coffee affects brain activity, and according to recent research, it may be doing more than just providing an additional jolt of energy; coffee may be rewiring your brain.”

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  • If you drink these types of coffee, you could have a lower death risk

    By Megan Marples for CNN Health

    “Results showed that for people who drank a moderate amount of coffee, defined as 1.5 to 3.5 cups a day, those who sweetened their coffee had about a 30% lower death risk compared with non-coffee drinkers, according to Dr. Christina Wee, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.”

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May 2022
Week of May 30, 2022
  • Exploring the nutraceutical properties of coffee

    By Stefannie Corea for Perfect Daily Grind

    “With growing pressure to minimise the amount of waste produced by the coffee supply chain, there is understandably interest from food and pharmaceutical companies about reusing the byproducts of coffee production as functional ingredients. […] Nutraceuticals are often defined as food-derived products that supposedly provide both nutritional and medical benefits, such as helping to mitigate the impact of certain health conditions.”

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  • What Is Natural Process Coffee?

    By Liz Clayton for Sprudge

    “Coffee terms can be a bit confusing. Isn’t all coffee natural? Isn’t all coffee processed somehow in order to get it from the farm to a state where we can drink it? What we mean when we say natural process is that the path the coffee fruit takes from the treelet to the cup involves less complex intervention at the farm level than other methods, like washed or honey process coffees. In the natural process, the whole coffee fruit is left intact to dry after being harvested, which ultimately affects a coffee’s flavor. In some regions, natural process is known as ‘dry process.’”

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  • Indigenous Tea Makers of India

    By Banglanatak and an independent third party for Google Arts & Culture

    “Learn about the Tangsas and Singphos, original and age-old tea brewing communities from Arunachal Pradesh, India.”

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  • Extraction wars: Espresso vs. ristretto

    By Sam Koh for Perfect Daily Grind

    “A ristretto […] is the shorter sibling of the espresso – but just because it’s shorter doesn’t mean that it has less to offer. […] In Italian, ristretto means “restrict”, and it translates as such into your little demitasse cup. A ristretto is a restricted, “shorter” version of an espresso: it uses less water and so makes a smaller drink. Depending on the café or barista’s policies, the ristretto will be anything from 15 to 25ml. Because the ristretto is so small, most coffee shops choose to only offer double ristretto shots.”

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Week of May 23, 2022
  • Is It Safe to Drink from Stainless Steel?

    By Chris Sands for Tasting Table

    “High-quality stainless steel is a better choice than either plastic or aluminum, but it's important to note that some lower quality stainless steel water bottles have had their own problems with leaching chemicals.”

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  • Exploring the language of specialty coffee

    By Paul Ashby for Perfect Daily Grind

    “When you’re buying beans or visiting specialty coffee shops, you might come across terms like third wave, single origin, micro lot, or artisan. For those who are new to the specialty coffee sector, this language can be confusing. As such, for coffee professionals looking to make the specialty coffee industry more accessible, there’s a simple first step: breaking down and defining this terminology. In doing so, they will give consumers the capacity to make more informed purchasing decisions. So, what are the most common terms used in specialty coffee and what do they really mean, especially in the context of the wider industry?”

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  • Why Some Plant-Based Milks Are More Nutritious than Cow’s Milk

    By Haldan Kirsch for Tasting Table

    “Milk producers have long touted the nutritional benefits of drinking cow's milk. In some ways, dairy milk does have the lead on other alternatives, but there are some categories where they fall behind. So, which milk is the most nutritious?”

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Week of May 16, 2022
  • Birds and Bees Combined Give Big Boost to Coffee Crops, Study Shows

    By Daily Coffee News Staff for Roast Magazine

    “’The combined positive effects of birds and bees on fruit set, fruit weight, and fruit uniformity — key factors in quality and price — were greater than their individual effects,’ the researchers wrote. ‘Without birds and bees, the average yield declined nearly 25%, valued at roughly $1,066 per hectare.’”

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  • A guide to calibrating your espresso recipes

    By Shaun Aupiais for Perfect Daily Grind

    “In coffee shops across the world, one of the most common challenges baristas face is ensuring that espresso extraction remains consistent throughout each day. Ultimately, creating repeatable recipes for espresso leads to more consistent-tasting coffee, thereby increasing customer satisfaction. However, in order to extract espresso consistently, baristas must have an in-depth understanding of several extraction variables and how they influence coffee flavour. These include dose, yield, and extraction time.”

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  • When Is the Best Time to Add Flavor to Your Kombucha?

    By Lauren Rothman for Tasting Table

    “Naturally sweet ingredients such as fruit and fruit juice will add an extra amount of sugar for the SCOBY bacteria to consume, releasing carbonation as a result. Sealing the kombucha in an airtight bottle will trap that carbonation, creating the nice fizz we all crave in kombucha.”

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Week of May 9, 2022
  • Coffee May Greatly Reduce Risk of Chronic Liver Disease, Research Shows

    By Daily Coffee News Staff for Roast Magazine

    “Researchers from the UK pored over UK Biobank data involving nearly half a million study participants whose coffee consumption was reported at the beginning a 10.7-year median study period. Among all those participants, 78% reported drinking some kind of coffee, while the remaining 22% identified as non-coffee drinkers.”

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  • Exploring the evolution of manual espresso machines

    By Ana Paula Rosas for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Typically, when we talk about espresso equipment, we imagine a machine with groupheads, a steam wand, and a built-in boiler, whether it’s semi-automatic or fully automatic. However, in recent years, we’ve seen the resurgence of “simpler” alternatives: manual espresso machines which use pressure generated from the user pushing down on the brew chamber to extract coffee.”

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  • How Long You Should Steep Your Cold Brew

    By Haldan Kirsch for Tasting Table

    “Devoted fans may enjoy their cold brew throughout the year, but for most of us, traditional coffee's chill cousin tends to take center stage during the warm months of Spring and Summer. … It can even be easily made at home with coffee, water, and a little bit of time — though exactly how much time is a little tricky to lock down.”

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  • Learning more about Colombia’s indigenous coffee-producing communities

    By Nicholas Castellano for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Indigenous peoples’ histories and traditional cultures mean they often have a unique heritage of coffee production unlike other farming communities. However, in many cases, the challenges these groups face when selling their coffees are often not fully addressed by the wider coffee industry.”

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Week of May 2, 2022
  • A Report from the Front Line of Ukraine’s Coffee Community

    By Daily Coffee News

    “The coffee scene in Ukraine is stunning! Well, it used to be… but we are definitely bringing it back and it will thrive even better! The amount of specialty coffee shops and micro roasters, as well as big roasteries, is overwhelming. Almost every coffee shop has its unique style, approach and incredible design.”

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  • How can you make water perfect for brewing coffee?

    By Tasmin Grant for Perfect Daily Grind

    “For every cup of coffee you brew, roughly 98% is water. But water is rarely just water. Depending on your geographical location, it contains varying levels of a range of minerals and organic compounds. These minerals and organic compounds – mainly calcium, magnesium, and carbonates – all have different effects on how coffee extracts and what it tastes like. This means that no matter how high-quality your coffee is, your water might be stopping it from reaching its full potential.”

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  • Exploring the history of coffee cake

    By Ana Pipunic for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Many food blogs describe coffee cake as a cinnamon-infused sponge with a crumbly streusel topping made from butter, sugar, and flour. However, others refer to coffee cake as a coffee-flavoured sponge, often with coffee-flavoured cream and frosting as well. To understand how these different definitions came about, we must first explore the origins of coffee cake.”

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April 2022
Week of April 25, 2022
  • 2022 US Barista Champion Morgan Eckroth: The Sprudge Interview

    By Zac Cadwalader for Sprudge

    “There is no greater ambassador for specialty coffee here in the Year of Our Lord Two Thousand and Twenty-Two than Morgan Eckroth (she/they). With nearly 7 million combined followers across TikTok, YouTube, and Instagram as @morgandrinkscoffee, the Oregon-based coffee professional brings specialty coffee into the homes of people who may not otherwise seek it out.”

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  • Exploring Sicilian coffee production

    By Ana Pipunic for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Sicily is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with a typical Mediterranean climate of mild, wet winters and hot, dry summers. The island’s proximity to Africa can result in higher temperatures than most areas of Italy – making it more suitable for growing coffee.”

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  • Coffee is not just a drug to make us good worker bees. It’s a pleasure.

    By Tim Carman for The Washington Post

    ‘“Sorry, I haven’t had my coffee yet” is the standard-issue excuse, as if the drink’s sole purpose were to make us complete, fully functional humans. My issue with our current relationship with coffee is that it aligns too neatly with the people who have, over the decades, viewed us, the worker bees, mostly through the lens of our ability to produce.”

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  • What is Laurina coffee?

    By Jackson Booth for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Around the world, many consumers prefer to drink coffee which contains less caffeine. For some, it’s essential. Typically, people looking to minimise their caffeine intake opt for decaf coffee, where most of the caffeine is removed. Decaffeination usually involves soaking green beans in water, before passing them through several filters to remove the caffeine. But what about coffee varieties that are naturally low in caffeine? Laurina is one of the most prominent low-caf coffees in the world.”

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  • What Is Latte Art?

    By Liz Clayton for Sprudge

    “The most popular style of latte art among coffee aficionados and specialty shops is free-pour latte art, which is a pattern intentionally poured into the coffee by using milk (or a milk substitute) steamed into compact bubbles. The milk is then poured into the coffee with careful movements—angle and height matter here—to create the desired pattern, such as a rosetta, tulip, or heart.”

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Week of April 18, 2022
  • Waste coffee grounds could someday help detect brain waves.

    By the American Chemical Society

    “Spent coffee grounds have previously been used to make porous carbon supercapacitors for energy storage. But now, new research led by principal investigator Ashley Ross, Ph.D., has taken recycled coffee waste in another, more biological direction. She and her team have demonstrated that electrodes coated with carbon from this waste can detect trace levels of biomolecules in vitro. According to Ross, this is the first example of residual coffee grounds being repurposed for biosensing applications.”

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  • What’s the best way to clean the inside of a coffee maker? Here’s how to keep it clean.

    By Terry Baddoo for USA Today

    “A traditional way to clean a coffee maker involves flushing it through with a solution of water and vinegar. However, afterward, some feel that makes your first few cups of coffee taste and smell bad. A better, scent-free cleaning option is denture cleaning tablets.”

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  • What is channeling and how does it affect espresso extraction?

    By Zoe Stanley for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Have you been wondering why your espresso shots just don’t taste right? Are they extracting too quickly, spraying, or flowing out one side? If you’ve experienced anything like this when pulling a shot, the most common cause for many of these issues is something known as ‘channeling’.”

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  • Coffee Very Popular, Says National Coffee Association

    By Zac Cadwalader for Sprudge

    “Coffee is a pretty popular drink—as a Sprudge reader you don’t need me to tell you twice. But just how popular? Incredibly popular, according to the National Coffee Association, whose recent poll finds that coffee consumption in America is at ‘the highest it has been in two decades.’”

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  • What is koji fermented coffee?

    By Dominic Vittitow for Perfect Daily Grind

    “In recent years, experimental processing methods which leverage the power of fermentation (such as anaerobic fermentation and carbonic maceration) have become increasingly common. However, there is still room for further innovation in coffee processing. One of the newest emerging trends in processing is using something called ‘koji mould’ as a unique priming agent during the fermentation stage. This new method is commonly referred to as ‘koji coffee,’ ‘oryzae coffee’ or ‘koji supernatural processing’.”

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Week of April 11, 2022
  • How Local Coffee Groups Drive Change in Chile, Mexico & Peru

    By Gabriella Wong for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Peru, Chile, and Mexico might all be considered part of Latin America, but the similarities between their local coffee scenes end there. Here’s how different coffee organisations in these three countries are working to address some of the issues that each one is facing.”

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  • A Brief History of Manual Brewing Methods

    By Miguel Angel Hernandez for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Whether you’re a home brewer wanting to know more about which device to invest in, or a barista looking to better understand the origins of the device you use every day, you’ll benefit from knowing the history of the following manual brewing devices. Here’s how approaches to manual coffee brewing have changed over time, as well as the most popular devices that dominate the market today.”

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  • More Americans Drinking Coffee and Venturing Outside the Home, NCA Report Shows

    By Nick Brown for Daily Coffee News

    “The percentage of Americans who reported drinking coffee within the past day has reached a two-decade high (66%), while coffee drinkers are steadily returning to out-of-home coffee consumption as pandemic concerns ease.”

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  • Coffee Got Complicated: Know Your Natural from Your Washed from Your Honey

    By Lauren Mowery for Forbes

    “Consider the term ‘green coffee.’ Even the hue of standard commodity beans—the second most heavily traded commodity in the world after crude oil—can be several shades removed. Referring to the color of beans before roasting, green coffee can range from dark raisin to dried chickpea, and the taste profiles, for those attuned to them, can also be wildly different.”

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Week of April 4, 2022
  • Orange Juice and Coffee Is a Thing on TikTok

    By CoffeeTalk

    “Did you know that the majority of people on TikTok consume orange juice and coffee? In other words, orange juice with a shot of espresso. Not a glass of juice and a cup of coffee, as is customary for breakfast.”

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  • Drinking coffee could benefit your heart and help you live longer, research finds

    By Kristen Rogers for CNN

    “Contrary to worries among some doctors and the public, drinking coffee may actually protect your heart instead of causing or worsening heart problems. Drinking two to three cups of coffee daily has been associated with a 10% to 15% lower risk of getting heart disease, heart failure or a heart rhythm problem, or dying early for any reason, according to three research abstracts published Thursday.”

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  • A Complete Guide to the Greek Freddo

    By Tasmin Grant for Perfect Daily Grind

    “You might be wondering what exactly a Freddo is, and what makes it so beloved by Greeks. Or if you’ve enjoyed the espresso-based beverage yourself, you might be wondering how it fits into third wave coffee and international coffee culture in general. To answer both these questions, I spoke with Christos Zamanakis, Education and Quality Manager at Dimello Coffee, and Michalis Katsiavos, 2018 Greek Barista Champion, to explore the past, present, and future of this popular drink.”

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  • How Cold Brew Captured the Millennial Market

    By Tasmin Grant for Perfect Daily Grind

    “Having been invented several decades ago, it’s re-emergence as a popular beverage choice for younger generations is something coffee shops and roasters should be noting. By understanding how and why they enjoy cold brew, you can better market it to their preferences.”

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March 2022
Week of March 28, 2022
  • Should you microwave coffee?

    By Ana Pipunic for Perfect Daily Grind

    Samo believes that it depends on the coffee. “The outcome will be dependent on the coffee,” he says. “If a particular coffee scores highly, but has a delicate aroma, this is caused by smaller quantities of these volatile compounds. Reheating the coffee will destroy these volatile compounds, ultimately reducing the aroma.”

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  • What Is Honey Processed Coffee?

    By Liz Clayton for Sprudge

    Because coffee is a fruit, all coffee must undergo some form of “processing” at the farm level before it travels to your favorite coffee roaster and, ultimately, your cup. Honey process is one method that’s become more common in recent years—particularly in Costa Rica, the country typically credited with its popularity. Bad news for any bears reading this, though: no actual honey is involved.

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  • Exploring Hong Kong coffee culture

    By Dominic Vittitow for Perfect Daily Grind

    While its historic relationship with tea might spring to mind first, Hong Kong has a vibrant and diverse coffee culture. Through the 20th and 21st century, the city’s coffee culture has understandably been influenced by cafés in other major consuming countries in the Asia-Pacific – including mainland China, Japan, and Taiwan.

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  • Here’s What Your Coffee Order Says About You

    By Anna Lewis for Delish

    Working with Coffee Friend, human behavioural expert Darren Stanton, who is a former police detective and psychologist with 26 years of experience analysing deception detection and emotional signals, has revealed what your coffee order says about you. But be warned... you may not like what you hear. Yes - we're talking to you, flat white drinkers.

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Week of March 21, 2022
  • Can Coffee Help Cure a Hangover?

    by CoffeeTalk

    Here’s the deal: That java juice may not be as effective as you believe at alleviating the effects of a hangover — in fact, it may exacerbate some of your symptoms. James Roach, DO, an emergency medicine physician, explains.

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  • The Surprising Way Boston Settled a Coffee ‘Shortage’ in 1777

    by Molly Harris for Mashed

    Over a three-year period from 1776 to 1779 during the revolution, these shortages sparked more than 30 riots targeted at fellow colonists who controlled the vast majority of the products. Some hoarded, while others simply price-gouged their customers. One such merchant and American patriot to do so was Thomas Boylston. What Boylston didn't realize is that he would be faced with a mob of women who took matters into their own hands while their husbands were away fighting for independence.

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  • What is flash brew coffee?

    by Matthew Deyn for Perfect Daily Grind

    Today, when most people talk about cold coffee, cold brew or iced coffee generally come to mind first. But as far back as the 1960s, people were enjoying an entirely different kind of cold coffee beverage in Japan: Japanese iced coffee, also known as flash brew. It wasn’t until the late 20th and early 21st century, however, that this beverage started to become popular further afield in the US. Since then, it has played a role in the wider rise of cold coffee.

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1 Comment

  • RP
    Roger Pilotti

    Very interesting, I enjoyed the information.

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